Don't Tread on Liberty

Hope for Washington? A Good Sheriff is a Good Start

February 15, 2022 Jason Davis Season 3 Episode 7
Don't Tread on Liberty
Hope for Washington? A Good Sheriff is a Good Start
Show Notes Transcript

With the election season starting to heat up, we will be interviewing several candidates for office. Starting today we talk to someone that has his work cut out for him. He's running for Sheriff in Washington State (obviously a leftist stronghold). Can he hold his ground? Can he win? Everyone in this country should be asking their Sheriff a question: Will you protect my rights? 

With almost 30 years in law enforcement, David Shook is running for Sheriff. We don't agree on everything but he came in and took the questions, and we respect him greatly for that. We ask the questions, you decide. As we have made very clear on many shows in the past, the Sheriff is likely the most important seat in your local government. Pay attention!

NOTE: As candidate for Sheriff, all opinions and statements made on the program are the opinion of David Shook and not necessarily the position of Clark County or the Clark County Sheriff's Office. 

David Shook for Sheriff - www.Shook4Sheriff.com

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Jason Davis:

Hey, welcome back to don't try to liberty. Thanks for being here. I'm Jason Davis. And, you know, this year we're starting to ramp up, it's gonna be election time pretty soon. It's getting exciting. And like we always do, we'd like to have candidates that are running for office on the program. And I'm a little partial to people running for sheriff, as many of you know. So today, I'm going to bring in a candidate that we have running for sheriff in Washington State. And God knows Do they need a good share of there? He's actually in Clark County, Washington, which is Vancouver area. David Shoop is with us, David, thanks for being here. How are you?

David Shook:

Well, thank you very much. David shook actually shown sorry about that. It's like it looks like past tense for shake. Used to have a lot of nicknames associated with that. But that's right.

Jason Davis:

Okay, that works for me. So David's about an almost a 30 year veteran in law enforcement. And now running for sheriff in Clark County, which is very interesting, because as everybody knows, Washington and Oregon, are kind of like demilitarized zones. These days. We all watched Portland burned to the ground, I think it was like 180 days straight. They were on fire with the BLM and Antifa people last year, and, and all of that, and Seattle, not much better. And, you know, they have a lot of problems there. And this is all coming from their left wing governance and defund the police movement. So, David, I mean, you're on the ground there, you kind of watched all this happen, you're on the job. What do you think of BLM? I mean, is it like a social justice movement? Or are they like a terrorist organization?

David Shook:

Well, I think that BLM started off with some, really some, maybe some decent ideas, but it turned into something that was more of a social justice, and also a movement again, society of what's going on, you know, policing is about rules and laws. And following that. Here in Clark County. Actually, we didn't have much BLM or the Antifa efforts because we weren't Portland, right. So everybody wanted to go down to Portland, they wanted to be a part of that. Like he said, 100 plus days of writing. And so we got folks that were passing through some got lost or is just a few small events. But really, we lucked out that we were north of the Columbia River.

Jason Davis:

Okay, so you kind of lucked out of that. But nevertheless, you know, that movement is very prevalent, and I think Antifa started in Oregon, they're kind of base there, right? That's where their big numbers are.

David Shook:

And West Coast has definitely had a stronghold on Antifa and other anarchist groups over the years, many years back.

Jason Davis:

Yeah. And you know, it's funny, because the left and you know, the Justice Department and many of these left wing state governments, they'd have you believe that parents going to school board meetings are terrorists, but I would say that these guys really qualify as terrorist organizations. I mean, they're the ones burning stuff down and assaulting people. I think there was some murders in that chasse chop zone, where they wouldn't let the cops go in and all of that, right. So I mean, these guys are bad news. We hear a lot of talk about the proud boys, but I don't really see proud boys committing murders and burning stuff to the ground. Right.

David Shook:

I guess what I would tell you is I don't care if you're the proud boys or if you're an Tifa. Right, using violence to get your message across is just wrong, at my opinion. And I think the laws here in Washington State are very clear on that the sheriff's that's I think four of their eight tenants is all about community safety and quelling violence and putting riots down and things like that. The current Sheriff he he had a line in the sand and that's people got arrested, they didn't get right out of jail. There was a process there and and I intend to hold that same ground. And again, I don't I don't care what your messaging is when you start using violence and you start hurting people or creating damage. That's just inappropriate.

Jason Davis:

Yeah. And you know, but the this all comes downhill from the government right like the Capitol I mean, you see Kate Brown, the the governor there in Oregon, she's granting executive clemency the violent criminals. I mean, the prosecutors are up in arms about this. It's happening all over San Francisco, same thing. They won't prosecute crimes there. All the left wing cities are burning down. So you're kind of a little removed. You're about two and a half hours there from Seattle. Right but, but fairly close to Portland. So when if you come into the sheriff's position, I know you just said kind of like law and order by the book type of guy. But if the prosecutors or if the governor says they're not going to prosecute, what are you going to do?

David Shook:

You know, the funny thing about it is that the DA and MoMA County, which is Portland, right, he's the one who was a George Soros guy, he got in there with his help and assistance and in the movements of Portland was doing as a community. He's the one who has also failed to prosecute and various things. The prosecutor here in Clark County is not at least vocally that way, here we have a problem with jail space, we have a problem with putting inmates and criminals in, you know, in school place and holding them for what the law will allow. So there is definitely a balance. But here in Washington State, and much like Oregon, and California, they lean very far left. And so it's really important to have strong leadership to be able to get in there and and really kind of duke it out and make sure that the safety of our community is paramount. Right. And so, again, if the prosecutors not doing their job, if the judges are not doing their jobs, I think it's incumbent upon the sheriff's to make sure the public's aware that to inform them of the processes and procedures and how it's not working. And so I think that is an uphill battle for most law enforcement in this side of the country. But they're all valiantly fighting for that. So I will continue to do that as well. I expect to make some great relationships there. But I will be pushing for law and order and making sure that we're able to take cost cities and criminals into some sort of a process to lessen the effect on the community.

Jason Davis:

Yeah, you know, we were talking before off the air and my old boss, Sheriff Jor, PIO, he, he basically did that He basically took it upon himself and said, No, we got plenty of room for criminals. And he put up some tents and put a fence around them and created a tent city. And, hey, we always have vacancies here in Maricopa county jails. So, um, you know, so you could do that? Absolutely. As Sheriff, you could do a lot of things, which is why I think it's one of the most important offices that we have in local government. So what is going on up there with this defund the police movement? Are you having to deal with that?

David Shook:

You know, actually, the community here in Clark County, and even much of the much of the state minus the Seattle area, has really not had a huge push for defund the police, right? We really are separate from Oregon and Portland. And so that's, that's a good thing. They've had some lessening of their costs and policing, and they're having the same problems, like every other big urban city is having, just like us is getting police officers wanting to stay and fight this valiant fight. But we've got some great people here in Clark County and Vancouver. And there's a lot of people that are moving around and the sheriff's the local, local legislatures, they're working. And and here not defined, but the police reform laws that were passed last year have had a an effect on policing and our crime waves here in this area. So those are the areas where you find a lot of people battling back trying to clean up those new laws or some unintended consequences. Like you can't have military equipment that's bigger than a 50 caliber. Right? So a lot of the less lethal 40 millimeter platforms that round is the size of 50 caliber. Right? So literally most of the police agencies here in the state had to closet those and until this law gets changed a little bit. And so there were some unintended consequences that a lot of good people are fighting right now. But it definitely is hampered the police and getting out there. You know, one of the laws actually raised the level of the Terry stop, we know and as long time police officers, right, reasonable suspicion that you're about to commit did commit or you're going to commit a crime. Well, here the state has changed the law locally, statewide to basically require probable cause before you can stop somebody associated with a crime right? Well, that's that's allowed some criminals to go free. You know, the cops are on scene. They can't stop them from leaving, because they don't have quite enough information. So it's really changed some of the dynamics and policing in the state. And they're working on those laws too. You know, there were reasons special interest groups and others tried to get that laws change, but it's really impacted law enforcement in the criminal element here.

Jason Davis:

Yeah, and anytime you say words like police reform and accountability, I just think it's a left wing buzzword for let's hogtied the cops and make it harder for them to enforce the law. So one more thing about sheriff. You know, the reason that it's my favorite local position to be elected to is because you're the chief law enforcement officer in the county. And you solely work for the people. I mean, you don't you're not appointed by a mayor or a county manager or a city manager. You You don't serve at the pleasure of a politician. You serve only the people directly. They're your boss. So as Sheriff, you really have the ability to get outside of politics and do the right thing. Now, one of the big problems we have in our country is everybody's rights being trampled on. You know, over the last couple of years, we've had, you know, your freedom of movement is restricted. We've had people's businesses be closed. You've had people be quarantined for no reason. I mean, this is all without due process of law, which is totally unconstitutional. So as Sheriff first of all, what do you think about that? And secondly, what will you do about it as Sheriff?

David Shook:

Well, I, I find it important, right, that we have three equal branches of government, right? The sheriff is a part of the executive branch, right? You are elected by the people. But I have to work together. And so first of all, I don't believe in the maths mandates as far as arresting people in doing those kinds of things. However, I do believe that citizens who have businesses, they have a right to set up expectations for their their businesses as well. I think the government has overreached a little bit in some of those areas of vaccinations. Personally, I've been vaccinated, I had some older parents, and one of them actually passed away over the last couple of months. And so I was worried about bringing in since I'm contacting hundreds of people a day generally have some of that. And so anyways, just to be honest, I just Today's my first day back on the road, after three weeks with COVID, my whole family had COVID, we've been down for, you know, fighting and battling that. So again, the vaccine was not helpful. But again, some other things were and we fought back from that. So going back to what the sheriff is and how that is, we don't have enough sheriff's deputies or police officers on the road right now to successfully compel or stop the criminal element much less than this administrative element where the governor or local health officials will make these rules or try to make these rules right. And so the sheriff I'm not going to be able to support that I'm not going to be able to take all my staff off of the criminal components to go do this administrative thing. So I don't believe in that i i believe that people have the rights to decide whether they're going to be vaccinated or not. I believe that you should have the right in public to be able to wear a mask or not. Right it's once you dive into Horace Mann, I wouldn't want to arrest anybody for trespassing or causing a scene or things like that. But again, we as a community have to work together. And so I'm not quite sure about the the overarching governors in the in the the CDC and all that kind of stuff passing their laws, but the police don't have enough personnel. In fact, Clark County is the lowest staff county in the state at point six 7% per 1000 Right there, the lowest paid and the lowest man per per agency in the state. We don't have any personalities and not be focused on the larger criminal element. So we're not going to be participating in any roundups, we're not going to be participating in any security safety things. And we're going to focus on stopping the criminal element here in Clark County, if I become Sure.

Jason Davis:

Okay, so you're going to focus on the criminal element, which is your main priority. That's what I hear you saying. But let me push back a little bit. I mean, so So as Sheriff, you're going to take an oath to uphold the Constitution of the United States. So the Constitution clearly most of these things violate so I understand you're not going to participate. But will you intercede, to prevent these things from happening to protect your citizens from being trampled over by politicians and bureaucrats?

David Shook:

Right? Yeah. So So you you said, you know, I think it's been nine times I've raised my hand to swear to follow the Constitution, the state laws and Washington and Oregon. Right. So it's not just the Constitution. It's the state laws in the state that wherever you're a police officer, I'm sure in Arizona, where you were at, you did the same thing.

Jason Davis:

Let me stop you there. The Constitution is the supreme law of the land. Absolutely. So any other law, too? Yeah. Right. So any other law that is in violation of those principles is void?

David Shook:

Well, but But you, I understand what you're saying, right? The constitution is the main guiding principles for this country for hundreds of years. Right. But along the way, there has been laws and different things that direct us to do things. So for example, use Miranda, you knew? For years you used to do Miranda, right? Why would you read Miranda to somebody? Because in the 60s, the courts came out and said, you shall do this right, as a part of a process or due process and other things. And so again, we can't just follow some laws, and let the others go, sorry, we're not going to participate. I'm a rule follower. Right? I follow those rules. But again, I think our job is sheriffs or police officers in general, is to make sure that we're following all the rules that go along with that, right. And so as we continue to have this conversation, it's like, well, what are those rules? The Constitution says this, and this, and this, you know, and so your first amendment rights and all those rights that you get in that Bill of Rights is super important to follow. But there are time, place and manner things that have come along, associated with those amendments. Right. And so again, for the government needs to follow those rules. And if they're not following those rules, the citizenry should be suing their butts, right? It should that's the process, you don't follow the rules as the government, you get sued. I'm all for that, as Sheriff, I wanted to follow those rules, because I don't want to be sued. So again, I understand what you're saying, and but there's not just one guiding principle here. There are more guiding principles for us as a country as a state.

Jason Davis:

Well, you're right, that court, you know, Supreme Court rulings have come out over the years, like the Miranda ruling, that have impacted how law enforcement does their job. You're absolutely right about that. But but the fact is, is that what they're doing now is far out of bounds. I mean, it's way out of bounds. Okay, so I just kind of wanted to know where you shake down on it. So I checked out your website. And, okay,

David Shook:

I'm sorry, I missed exactly what you're saying, right into this live podcast. I apologize.

Jason Davis:

All right. I know where it was. stuff. No worries. So what I was saying is I checked out your website, and you know, for the campaign. Sure. And and so you have in there. You know, 2020 exposed us talking about us as law enforcement. And the old way of doing things is no longer good enough type of thing. So So I'm curious about that. What What things are you talking about there specifically, that you're going to change as Sheriff?

David Shook:

Sure. So here in this local community and in Washington State, I, well just talk specifically about my community here, right. So in Washington, or I'm sorry, in Clark County here. These police officers have been doing a fabulous job, right. But when I went on my ride along before I got hired, I assessed and it felt like I was in the 1990s. Right, a lot of old school stuff are still happening. There was, you know, no technical, logical advances. You know, some of the training was old school, and it just has not advanced as an organization. I want to bring my experience from where I came from my former agency was leading the way and bringing programs and different things into our community to problem solve with some of the liveability things, some of the issues and having those conversations with our public. So, it's changing the efforts it's changing our processes and how we communicate with people. For far too long. I believe that it's been a four terian kind of of attitude when you deal with the public. And I think it's got to be more you know, it's not just do tell make it's hey, let's talk about I'm going to tell you why we're going to do things I still see videos today online where cops they're not communicating why they're using force, right? It's kind of a secret stealing why you're taking somebody into custody. I'm all about communicating with the public so that they know upfront. Hey, listen, you're gonna, we're talking about these are the reasons why I'm here. These are my authorities. And now guess what, if we move into uses of force or other things, we're going to do that, right. I think there's more education law enforcement could do these days and communication skills, mental health issues, you know, in all the years you worked on the road, you probably dealt with a lot of people with mental health issues and drug issues, right. That's what we deal with my majority of the time out there. And I want to bring more training to these deputies at this organization, so that they're better well prepared to deal with the complexity of, hey, you're going to be dealing with these folks on the street because there's nowhere to take them. Right. So how can we problem solve with what we're doing? So changing some of those things bringing technology here, Washington state is behind the times and technology like body cameras, the state has an open PDR process. And so it makes it really a problematic system, to share all that with the public. I want to bring technology here so that you have a third party that is just covering the news. It's just sharing what the event is, right. And it's really too bad these days that the word of police are not believed like they used to be, again, for whatever reason, but it would be nice to have that opportunity to record that somehow. Did you were cameras down in Arizona when you work there?

Jason Davis:

No. And it's funny that you just said that, because when I was on the job, like you go into court, whatever a cop says in court is like the gospel truth. No questions asked. That's exactly what happened. And that's the way it happened, period. Um, but not anymore. No. So when I was on the job, no, that was way before. Technology, like the cameras and you know, everybody with the cell phone and all that. So it was a little bit different. It was back in the good old days, right?

David Shook:

Back in the 1990s, early,

Jason Davis:

early to mid, you know, 2000s type.

David Shook:

There you go. Yeah, for sure.

Jason Davis:

But But yeah, I mean, things are a lot different. Now everybody's got a camera, and everybody wants to it's not just like, hey, look, they're doing something wrong. It's more like, hey, let's see what we can do to make them look as bad as we can. Or, or let's see how we can trap this and make this look really bad on TV.

David Shook:

And put it off just in front or just behind whatever happened did not show you the whole picture.

Jason Davis:

Because you know, as well as I do. You know, if you're at a scene and stuff goes south, you had a lot of things happening, and you have to act in a second. And you're not going to have time to you know, talk these people off a ledge or whatever. I mean, you just have to take action. So I feel like a lot of it, you know, you're not getting the full story. And you're not getting it in the context of the situation.

David Shook:

Of course, yeah, for sure. Yeah. And, you know, in my former organization, I was the program manager that put body cameras and things like that into the cars, right, we were buying to that was just as of 2015 16. And so the very first time of deployment of this system, there was an allegation of rape in this camera system, save that Deputy from an investigation. pretty egregious allegation. Right. And so technology cuts both ways, though, because sometimes we as humans, we don't always talk appropriately, or sometimes we, you know, we're into the moment and things happen, right. And so again, it's an opportunity to educate, it's an opportunity to do different things. I just think that, again, as technology and our community keeps moving forward, it's just helping with the discussion to be transparent, right. It's an opportunity to be better what we're doing and learning from it really, honestly.

Jason Davis:

Yeah, I think that body cameras, more than anything else, it probably going to protect the officers

David Shook:

had more success than not,

Jason Davis:

right. However, there is a big danger in this whole reform movement coming down from Washington DC, because, you know, it seems like the ultimate goal for them is to federalize local police, which is not good.

David Shook:

No. We need our states to step up and set standards for our police officers, our government officials, whatever that is, right. The federal government leaves around all this free cash, but it's not. It's not free. There's no freeness with this cash. It always comes with expectations or whatever that's like, hey, You're going to change what you're doing. But it really is the opportunity for us as a state of Washington, I'll just speak about us to step up and say, Hey, listen, we're not perfect. You know, however, there are some different things that we could do. You know, and again, just because a mistake is made doesn't make it a criminal mistake, and I think that's where this pendulum has swung, right. And that's not really the case, you know, these fast events that are spontaneous in nature, and you're looking for perfection in an imperfect person. Right. And that's just the wrong attitude to have. But that goes into education. Right? That's been my background for most of my career is educating cops to use force to shoot guns, when how and why to drive fast, and all that kind of stuff. And you just, when you see that light, come on, on a police officer, there's good people, there's, I think 99.9% of the people that become cops are amazing people wanting to do good. And I think that's what we need to keep bringing into our ranks here, because this is a profession, get rid of the stuff that's not good. Keep bringing in the people that are going to make an amazing,

Jason Davis:

well, and that's the problem, because who's gonna want to be a cop in this kind of environment?

David Shook:

You know, I would tell you in the 60s, again, bad environment, right? In the 90s, when you and I first started our policing career, right, Rodney King happened and what 92 I think it was, yeah, again, bad environment. 2020 George Floyd, all the other things that happened through the 2000s. Again, it's but it's being honest about right. People think, well, cop, somebody got shot cop is bad, right. And they forget to talk about what precipitated or what happened before that event occurred. The violence, the shootings, we're having, we have more cops ambush last year than we've had ever. Yep. Right. When I was first training cops to be defensive and how to take care of themselves. I used to say, well, you know, Ambush is a thing, but it really doesn't happen.

Jason Davis:

But the difference now, but the difference now, the difference now is that not even the agency will back you.

David Shook:

Right here it here in this area, the I believe that the police administrators are fearful for being honest, or at least portraying the information that they know what the time, hey, it looks like, we have this kind of a shooting, we're going to investigate it, we're going to go forth, and we're going to look into it. Creating those better relationships, rebuilding trust in our community. Those are the things that are our ongoing all the time. And when we forget it as police officers, or we're making a mistake, one mistake sets us back a long time. And so that's another thing that I'm going to be doing here as Sheriff is rebuilding that trust. But it's an honest trust both ways, right? It's just not bad cops is Hey, bad citizens. And these are the things that we need to try to do something different about.

Jason Davis:

Okay, last question. And this goes back to the unconstitutional stuff that they do. So in your state, a Washington State Legislature section 246 Dash 100 Dash 040. This is procedures for isolation and quarantine, that's working its way through your process here to become law at his or whole as his or her sole discretion. A local health officer may issue an emergency detention order causing a person or group of persons to be immediately detained for purposes of isolation. What in the world is going on up there at the Statehouse?

David Shook:

I read that the other day somebody had sent it to me, you might have sent it or mentioned it too. That's just craziness to me, right. In fact, there is a push by a by partisan group to limit the emergency laws that the governor is currently is using to to focus and do whatever the heck he wants. Right. Um, so there's some other things working there as well. I think that there are some people that are misguided and Miss informed. They're not taking the current information that's that's been learned, right, two plus years of COVID restrictions and not knowing what it was in the beginning to now we know where it's at, where in England, they basically cut off all the all the authority or all the mandates, right, other countries that are starting to realize and recognize that as well. I think that there are some people here that maybe be a little power hungry, they're holding on to some of those authorities in that emergency branch and to be able to be the king for the state. And I think it's wrong, and I think more people need to be standing up To say, Listen, hospitals aren't overflowing like you're talking about, you know, you fired all your health workers that didn't want to take a jab. You know, and I think that is time for communities to step up and be honest with those health directors who's just an MD Doctor generally. Right? And they're working with the state and the different folks there. And they're working with Washington who are all pushing this current agenda. Right. I think there's more and more people that are tired of the current agenda. So his share if you're like, Well, gosh, you know, what would you do that sounds illegal and everything else? Well, definitely share. Those are some things that we're going to be talking about. And again, as I said, Before, I don't have enough, we don't have enough people in Clark County, to take care of the murders and the rapists and the robberies. And that's not going to be something if I'm elected a sheriff that we're going to be participating in, we're, we're, we're holding these almost like concentration camps, you know, these, hey, guess what, we're gonna put these cages up, and we're gonna hold you until you've gone your 710 days or whatever else. It's just not something that I'm going to participate in. So again, it just feels wrong. It sounds wrong. You know, I understand there's there's a lot of that going around. And they're people that think they're well intended. And I just think it's a mistake. And it's not, it's not appropriate, it's against the law. It's against the Constitution, right? You and I should, right to take a vaccination or not. If we don't want to take our kids to school, guess what, you don't have to get them vaccinated. Right. You don't have to follow that regime that you do if you want to take them to public school. And guess what we as adults, we as kids in our pair, if we're parents of kids, we should have the right to tell doctors, government and whoever else, that there is a freedom to medical processes and vaccinations and all that stuff.

Jason Davis:

My body my choice, right? You say again? My body my choice, right? Absolutely. Absolutely. That's what they like to say all the time when they want to kill babies. That's right. Yeah. But not when it not when it comes to taking a jab? I guess not that. Okay. Yeah,

David Shook:

it should be a equal protection, right. If you can say that terminology for whether you're an abortion or a person or not, or whether you're a vaccine person, right, you should have that right. As a human as a United States citizen to it's my right. I get to choose that not not you the government?

Jason Davis:

Yeah. I mean, if they can tell you what to do with your body. I mean, David, I mean, what what can't they tell you?

David Shook:

I, I feel like if good citizens don't stand up and are honest about the socialist push that this country is going towards, that we're going to have a problem. And we're going to have it's going to be back towards maybe even some civil type, infer, you know, things going on. And that's not a good place to be either. They've already fought that war long ago. Yeah, it's it's time to focus on where we're at now and making sure that the right people are in office, right? If we've got some bad politicians, we need to get together and fix that. I'll tell you here in Clark County, the Republican side of the political debate is fractured. And it's it's an interesting scheme to watch. And it's tough, right? Because I'm a Republican. I'm a conservative guy. I'm not a far right conservative guy, but I'm somewhere in the middle there. And when I see that happening, I'm just like, oh, my gosh, that is not going to help in trying to find the right agendas for a balanced effort here, because it's just an eye here. And again, this is my first political office ever. You know, I don't have any problems with managing leading 450 People that doesn't scare me at all. It's the politics part of it. I think Sheriff should be nonpartisan. I think it's, uh, I want to I want to have equal protection and equal access for everybody. Because, like, I'm talking to you today, I was talking to some very liberal leaning guy yesterday. And again, he's like, you know, you're a Republican or conservative. And I like you, you've got the right demeanor of what I would want in my sheriff. And I think that's important for an elected official who has this huge responsibility. Right. And so again, that's the part that I'm just I scratched my head, sometimes. I'm like, Oh, my gosh, whether it's right or left or whatever. And I like I told you before, I don't care what your messaging is, when you start hurting people that's wrong. And that's kind of where I fall on that.

Jason Davis:

Yeah. Well, I agree with a lot of what you say there. I think you're, I mean, I know you're running for office. I think you'd be really nice about it. You're being really gentle. But I hear what you say in there. And I agree with the with the underlying thought there. It's David shook for share so shook for the number four Sheriff dot com. That's correct. And then

David Shook:

you I'm on social media all over the place every platform you can be with those with that name Shokan in the number four sheriff. So

Jason Davis:

now if people want to help you out, just go there and they can plug in donate, get involved with your campaign, all that stuff, right? Yep, there's

David Shook:

a place where you can write your name down and it'll send an email directly to me. We are looking for volunteers for putting signs up for getting out on the street corners helping us to push our messaging out to the different groups around our county because this county is kind of an interesting County we just went over 503,000 people and they don't recognize how broke the system is here. Or jail is falling down building is falling down inmates we can't we can't hold hardly any. And the policing model here is just out of date. It's not helpful our mental health system like everywhere else is broke. And the drugs are crazy. You know, and so we have some refocusing and re efforts that we need to do here and and ship for sheriff and Dave ship personally, I need your help getting my message out there to the rest of the citizenry here in Clark County.

Jason Davis:

Well, David, we really appreciate you coming on and I wish you the best of luck with the campaign and God knows we need all the great sheriff's we can get thank you for coming on.

David Shook:

Thank you, Jason. If I find myself down in Phoenix, I'll come visit you Okay,

Jason Davis:

definitely give me a call.

David Shook:

Okay. Take care, sir. Thank you.